Culture secretary

The BBC overhaul promised by the Culture Secretary can’t come soon enough

Beeb sends all the wrong signals

THE BBC shake-up promised by Nadine Dorries can’t happen anytime soon.

The Culture Secretary’s plan to freeze the annual license fee of £159 for two years is a great start.

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Chief executive Tim Davie said freezing annual license fees of £159 for two years would lead to massive cuts to programming and job lossesCredit: PA
We reveal today that the BBC is wasting millions of pounds of license fee funds on nonsensical woke projects

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We reveal today that the BBC is wasting millions of pounds of license fee funds on nonsensical woke projectsCredit: Alamy

General manager Tim Davie said it would lead to massive cuts to programming and job losses.

But as we reveal today, the broadcaster is still wasting millions of pounds of royalty funds on nonsensical projects.

On Mr Davie’s £525,000-a-year watch, the Company has taken on even more bosses with sky-high salaries.

A diversity champion wins the colossal sum of £267,000 a year for a three-day week.

Having already earmarked £12m of its radio and music budget for virtue signaling content, the Beeb says: “This is just the start.”

Meanwhile, he promotes revival podcasts while censoring “politically incorrect” jokes on classic shows.

The tragedy of all this is that the Society’s efforts to prove that it is “relevant” to the younger generation may be in vain.

Either way, they’re moving to Netflix and Amazon in droves.

More and more people will wonder why they should pay the BBC’s outdated license fees when they never tune in.

The time has surely come to turn off the Beeb’s obligatory money tap.

The Prime Minister’s fate in a gray area

BORIS Johnson is locked up at Checkers this weekend, anxiously awaiting civil servant Sue Gray’s decisive verdict on the Downing Street lockdown parties.

But before MPs and voters rush to judge, they should remember his very real accomplishments.

Boris Johnson anxiously awaits civil servant Sue Gray's decisive verdict on Downing Street lockdown parties

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Boris Johnson anxiously awaits civil servant Sue Gray’s decisive verdict on Downing Street lockdown partiesCredit: PA

After the crippling paralysis of Theresa May’s regime, Boris promised Brexit and delivered.

He went on to win an overwhelming majority of 80 seats in the 2019 general election.

He nearly died from Covid but bounced back – much like the UK economy under his watch.

Its deployment of world-class vaccines has enabled the UK to lead Europe out of the pandemic.

All this in the face of hysterical insults from the opposition and snipers from deputies who owe their careers to his verve.

Yes, he made a lot of mistakes and was too slow to apologize.

But looking at the ledger, Tory MPs deciding the Prime Minister’s fate will also have to consider his achievements, and the fact that it was his vision for the upgrade that Red Wall constituencies voted for.

The UK needs a government focused on the day-to-day concerns of voters – like the terrifying cost of living crisis.

BoJo needs to show that he’s still capable of seizing the day.

Culture Sec Nadine Dorries orders BBC out of its elite ‘London bubble’ as she confirms license fee freeze